1978 spider timing issue

autox19

True Classic
so I needed to replace the 20+ year old semi rotting timing belt before I venture on trying to start it after sitting for the same 20+ years. when I was setting up the timing marks before I removed the belt, the belt snapped. from what I can tell, nothing hit anything, but now my timing is not at TDC. how should I go about setting things to tdc without mashing valves? is this an interference engine?


Odie
 

Andy

True Classic
If you are referring to your 79 X you should have a 1500 which is a non-interference engine.
setting the cam and crank to TDC via the timing marks, and the distributor rotor pointing to the #4 plug wire should get you in the neighborhood.

For reference 1300cc engines are interference, I would suggest setting the crank 90 degrees off the timing mark that puts the pistons in the center of their stroke, then set cam, then set crank to timing marks. Turn the crank slowly and carefully, if any resistance is met don't force things.
 

kmead

Old enough to know better
The 1.8 is an interference engine. If it is a 2.0l 1979 or later it is a free wheeler.

The lobe on the auxiliary shaft is interference regardless of year on a 2.0 so put it where it should be and you can creep up on the correct timing for the crank and cams.

If it is a 1.8, I would pull the spark plugs to gain a view of where the pistons are (4 dowels the same length to indicate approx position) remove the valve covers to see where they are relative to the piston locations.

Sorry just saw the year. It is a 1.8 and yes it is an interference engine.
 

autox19

True Classic
If you are referring to your 79 X you should have a 1500 which is a non-interference engine.
setting the cam and crank to TDC via the timing marks, and the distributor rotor pointing to the #4 plug wire should get you in the neighborhood.

For reference 1300cc engines are interference, I would suggest setting the crank 90 degrees off the timing mark that puts the pistons in the center of their stroke, then set cam, then set crank to timing marks. Turn the crank slowly and carefully, if any resistance is met don't force things.
nope. as title said, it is the 1978 spider. the '79 have a b16 in it.

Odie
 

autox19

True Classic
The 1.8 is an interference engine. If it is a 2.0l 1979 or later it is a free wheeler.

The lobe on the auxiliary shaft is interference regardless of year on a 2.0 so put it where it should be and you can creep up on the correct timing for the crank and cams.

If it is a 1.8, I would pull the spark plugs to gain a view of where the pistons are (4 dowels the same length to indicate approx position) remove the valve covers to see where they are relative to the piston locations.

Sorry just saw the year. It is a 1.8 and yes it is an interference engine.
yeah that was my thought. good think I bought valve cover gaskets! my other thought, (input requested) would be to pull the cams so all valves are shut, then set the crank and aux, then put the cams back in.

Odie
 

NM850

True Classic
No need to pull cams. Slowly turning the engine by hand will not damage anything even if contact is made.
 

Andy

True Classic
duh, jusat saw the subject.. Sorry Odie.

Again, I would rotate the crank to be 90 degrees off TDC, set cams to TDC, then crank to TDC, aux shaft should have the pin hole pointing to 1:00 (or the tensioner spring retention bolt referenced as #6 in the picture below.).
upload_2019-5-1_9-31-22.png
 

autox19

True Classic
my worry is where the cams are when I rotate the crank. Which is why my thought of removing the cams. but will be VERY happy if that is not needed.

Odie
 

Andy

True Classic
just turn it slow, with the plugs out your might be able to rotate the crank by hand.
If you feel resistance, back the crank up a little, and rotate one of the cams and check again.
Once the pistons are in the middle you can turn the cams as needed, though I believe (little voice in the back of my head) that it is possible to bump intake to exhaust valves, as long as you use minimal force you should be fine.
 
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