Brake Lines

Discussion in 'Workshop Forum' started by robsad, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. robsad

    robsad True Classic

    Location:
    Erie, PA
  2. kmead

    kmead True Classic

    Location:
    Michigan
    Are these pure copper or the copper nickel (cunifer) alloy now being specified.

    I don’t know the specification they reference in the listing.
     
  3. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Did they give you a shipping quote for those?
     
  4. EricH

    EricH Eric Hamilton Moderator

    Location:
    Durham NC, USA
    The distribution block next to the master cylinder in the earlier cars used double flares for some connections instead of bubble flares (used everywhere else in the car). So no, you cannot use the earlier lines in a later car or vice versa.
     
    kmead, aarpcard and Daniel Forest like this.
  5. robsad

    robsad True Classic

    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Hi Karl,
    Don't know about the material used. He did respond that they don't have patterns for the early cars. It would be a great solution to old lines and frozen fittings. Now if someone could make master cylinders that last.
     
  6. EricH

    EricH Eric Hamilton Moderator

    Location:
    Durham NC, USA
    Making up your own lines is really pretty easy. Buy a roll of Cunifer tubing from FedHill USA, cut pieces to length (better a bit long than a bit short) and either buy a flaring tool or pay a local brake shop or machine shop to make the flares.
     
  7. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    If I needed to go through all of the effort to replace all of my brake lines and fittings, not only would I do as Eric suggests (buy a roll of tube to make your own lines). But I'd also consider utilizing adapter fittings to allow use of standard nuts and flares. It would be less expensive, make future repairs easier, and allow you to use a basic flaring tool to make the easy type flares yourself (although it really isn't that difficult to make bubble flares of you buy the right tool and practice a little).
     
  8. Mike Schofield

    Mike Schofield Daily Driver

    I third the making your own lines. I personally have invested in a roll of 3/16” diameter cupro nickel. It’s extremely durable and easy to form and flare. I have a simple little tube bender (although you can bend it by hand) and a set of flare tools from Princess Auto (Harbour Freight in US I believe).
    Easy peasy! I personally think the cupro nickel looks nicer than steel as well....
     
    Dr.Jeff and kmead like this.

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