Brake Lines

Discussion in 'Workshop Forum' started by robsad, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. robsad

    robsad True Classic

    Location:
    Erie, PA
  2. kmead

    kmead Old enough to know better

    Location:
    Michigan
    Are these pure copper or the copper nickel (cunifer) alloy now being specified.

    I don’t know the specification they reference in the listing.
     
  3. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Did they give you a shipping quote for those?
     
    gene cooley likes this.
  4. EricH

    EricH Eric Hamilton Moderator

    Location:
    Durham NC, USA
    The distribution block next to the master cylinder in the earlier cars used double flares for some connections instead of bubble flares (used everywhere else in the car). So no, you cannot use the earlier lines in a later car or vice versa.
     
  5. robsad

    robsad True Classic

    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Hi Karl,
    Don't know about the material used. He did respond that they don't have patterns for the early cars. It would be a great solution to old lines and frozen fittings. Now if someone could make master cylinders that last.
     
  6. EricH

    EricH Eric Hamilton Moderator

    Location:
    Durham NC, USA
    Making up your own lines is really pretty easy. Buy a roll of Cunifer tubing from FedHill USA, cut pieces to length (better a bit long than a bit short) and either buy a flaring tool or pay a local brake shop or machine shop to make the flares.
     
  7. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    If I needed to go through all of the effort to replace all of my brake lines and fittings, not only would I do as Eric suggests (buy a roll of tube to make your own lines). But I'd also consider utilizing adapter fittings to allow use of standard nuts and flares. It would be less expensive, make future repairs easier, and allow you to use a basic flaring tool to make the easy type flares yourself (although it really isn't that difficult to make bubble flares of you buy the right tool and practice a little).
     
  8. Mike Schofield

    Mike Schofield True Classic

    I third the making your own lines. I personally have invested in a roll of 3/16” diameter cupro nickel. It’s extremely durable and easy to form and flare. I have a simple little tube bender (although you can bend it by hand) and a set of flare tools from Princess Auto (Harbour Freight in US I believe).
    Easy peasy! I personally think the cupro nickel looks nicer than steel as well....
     
    Dr.Jeff and kmead like this.
  9. FalconStreak217

    FalconStreak217 Low Mileage

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Anyone have a hint at the brake line lengths?
    I need to (at a minimum) replace the main rear line, and possibly the clutch line as well (both rusted badly).
    Thx.
     
  10. Chris in Canada

    Chris in Canada True Classic

    Location:
    Ontario, canada
    My co-worker put me on to the copper/nickel line a few years back. He does plow trucks on the side. He pulled a line off a truck he had done 5 years before and under all the crud, it still looked new!! I was lucky with my x, as all I replaced were the master and all the flex lines! All the hard lines are mint!! We also have this super slick flaring tool at work that you fit different dies in. Does brake, fuel, tranny, I think any line!
     
  11. myronx19

    myronx19 True Classic

    Location:
    Toronto, ON Canada
    Mind you, it's possible to get a late model style distribution block and problem solved (if I'm not mistaken + all the little lines from the master that goes to it). I recall tearing apart a '75 and it had a distribution block that I've never seen before.
     
  12. gene cooley

    gene cooley Autocrosser

    Location:
    Henrico, Va
    Some of these lines don't stand up very well. I put them on my Suburban about 2 years ago, the fittings rusted so bad that they wouldn't come apart and the hex was gone. The outside of the lines corroded and pitted.
    Apparently the quality varies for the lines and fittings, some are good, some are junk.
     
  13. kmead

    kmead Old enough to know better

    Location:
    Michigan
    I would recommend products from this company:

    http://www.fedhillusa.com/

    They sell thick walled Cunifer and quality end fittings.
     
    gene cooley and EricH like this.
  14. EricH

    EricH Eric Hamilton Moderator

    Location:
    Durham NC, USA
    I'll second the recommendation for Fedhill USA.
     
    gene cooley likes this.
  15. gene cooley

    gene cooley Autocrosser

    Location:
    Henrico, Va
    Thanks. I plan to replace the rear brake lines on the 600 soon. I'll give them a try.
     
  16. myredracer

    myredracer True Classic

    The ebay seller's brake lines will be Nicopp (aka cunifer & cupro-nickel), not copper. Copper is illegal here. He also lists the front lines only as in his photo where you can see steel color inside the end of the tubing, so it's not copper. There is a company in the UK called Automec that makes these lines for a wide range of makes and models and is probably what they are. I bought an Automec set for my 600. Their lines are somewhat stiff and you'll want a brake tubing bender for tighter bends and maybe a straightener.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Rupunzell

    Rupunzell Bernice Loui

    Location:
    California
    Copper tubing MUST NEVER be used on any brake or hydraulic system. Copper work hardens, become brittle then cracks, then bleeds hydraulic fluid when fluid pressure is most needed.... as in crash or not crash panic stop.

    Copper-Nickel alloy brake tubing is completely different than the common copper tubing. It is specifically designed for auto brake systems with corrosion resistance and ease to flare and bend while remaining soft and reliable in auto hydraulic systems. Alternative to this would be SAE steel brake tubing except this tubing tends to corrode. Even the plastic coated steel brake tubing has corrosion problems once the coating is damaged or cracked due to aging.

    An alternative is annealed 302 or 316 seamless stainless steel tubing. Works ok, but required special flaring and bending and cutting tools due to the higher hardness of stainless steel.

    Speaking of copper hydraulic tubing, Friend had a problem with a BIG DoAll band saw, the hydraulic system lost pressure. Turns out the OEM hydraulic tubing is copper. Over many years and pressure cycles, the copper tubing work hardened, cracked then failed. The fix was to remove and replace ALL that copper tubing with a proper tubing that is not the OEM copper.


    Bernice
     
    autox19 likes this.

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