K20 project off to a good start

Discussion in 'Workshop Forum' started by Rodger, Feb 14, 2015.

  1. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    The seal flat was covered with the aluminum slug, so it looked like an unfinished casting, until I dug at it with a pick tool

    [​IMG]
     
    dllubin likes this.
  2. 128kid

    128kid Courtney Waters

    Location:
    Essex Junction, VT
    Exactly what I was thinking. Back in the college days we had that type of failure on our Formula SAE car. The oil pressure sender was screwed into the block (1/8" NPT threads) and after a fair amount of run time the threads cracked and it started leaking. We relocated it, mounted with a P-clamp, and connected with a flex hose and didn't have any issues from then on. This was a 600cc motorcycle engine rigidly mounted to a tube frame chassis, so there was a ton of vibration. My 128 has a 1300 X1/9 block with a VDO oil press sender stuffed in the factory oil port. No issues.
     
    Rodger likes this.
  3. 128kid

    128kid Courtney Waters

    Location:
    Essex Junction, VT
    I was going through this on a project at work (radial ports would have put the fittings through the hood) and some Googling came up with this Sanden catalog, which had good info on the available head types and compatibility:

    https://www.sanden.com/objects/Sanden Singapore SD7 Series Compressor Catalogue.pdf


    Rodger, your A/C work looks great! Of all the fluid systems in a vehicle, it seems like the A/C stuff is the worst to route and you did it in an X1/9 with an oversized engine... awesome!
     
    Rodger likes this.
  4. I used a steel pick and if mine was aluminum it was the hardest aluminum I've run into. Sure wish it was drilled out.
     
  5. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Hey Rodger

    Is there any way you can measure the offset of the carrier bearing bracket (where it attaches to block), to the center line of the axle? The new axle I bought won't fit the motor, the bracket is too deep. I'm just trying to confirm that the correct (RSX) bracket has approx 2" offset to axle centerline, not 2.5" which is what I received ...
     
  6. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    I measured from the base of the bracket where it attaches to the block to the centerline of the axle. As near as I can figure it is about 43 mm or 1 11/16ths inch.
     
  7. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Thank you, Rodger. That is closer to my rough measurement than what I received. Just wanted to make sure the offset of the axle/trans wasn't different with the RSX.
     
  8. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Hey Rodger

    Did you make a wiring schematic for this section of harness? Did you exend the wiring that normally feeds the EMS inside the spare wheel well for this?
     
  9. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Yes, I did. The harness in the photo started from the C101 connector that was part of the wiring harness of the donor car that I had purchased. I added all of the other connectors as needed. I ran the harness from the engine through the rear access panel and into the left rear wheel well where I mounted the ECU. There was really no room left in the spare tire well since I had added a subwoofer, plus the amplifier for it. Also, my access hole was much larger than the typical MWB install.

    Here is the diagram that I made based off of the one that came from Hondata.
    k20a wiring-custom Lawton.jpg
     
    lookforjoe likes this.
  10. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Many thanks Rodger! I'll cross check the ECU pinout against my ('05 Accord) version. I'm going to put mine pretty much where your amp is situated.
     
  11. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Hey Rodger

    Going through all your bay mod pics again :)

    Anyway you can get the spec on the reinforcing channel they used to beef up the crossmember?
     
  12. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    It was 1" x 1.5" rectangular stock.
     
    lookforjoe likes this.
  13. darwoodious

    darwoodious Darin Nelson

    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Rodger did as what was called for by MWB. You can do that and all good, or do what I did...

    IMG_0429.JPG IMG_2817.JPG
    This first photo shows what I did instead of the heavy stock: a somewhat thick 14G (0.0747") sheet welded across.

    The MWB team recommends cutting out the entire lower area for exhaust or something. I agree but wanted to be able to transfer load from that lower crossmember to the upper crossmember, so I built this:
    IMG_2066.jpg

    Here's what it looks like all installed.
    IMG_2075.jpg IMG_2076.jpg IMG_2080.jpg IMG_2079.jpg

    Here's my (hillbilly) thinking... The primary reason to reinforce the rear crossmember with the K20 kit is that the subframe takes ALL the torque from the engine at the suspension points. Nice, but now you need to reinforce. The primary torque under full throttle will be to twist the powertrain "back" (that is clockwise when looking at the driver from the left side of the vehicle) to power the vehicle forward. As I've said before - imagine the X trying to "pop a wheelie", then you get it.

    So all the force on the subframe, this the crossmember, is down. My goal was twofold: beef up the cross member lightly with nice tall/wide plates then look at how that transferred load to the rest of the chassis.

    I am trying to make it strong but keep the extra weight as low as possible. No idea if I have succeeded, but I have to go with my gut. It's my money so I'm doing my build my way. Hope this helps. Keep posting what you're doing to your build Hussein. :)
     
    lookforjoe likes this.
  14. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    This should certainly add to the rigidity of that area, but I can guarantee you would have an issue with the header coming through that opening and your welded in piece being in the way. That is if you were using the shorty headers that are available like I did. I am pretty sure you were going to build a custom header, so that should allow you to bring it back through the right side opening with no issues.
     
  15. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Somewhere I asked the specifics of the firewall insulation you chose, but I've been through every page of both threads & can't find that info. Can you provide it once more? :D

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
  16. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Dynamite Hoodliner. Very sticky. Once it is on, it does not come off easily.
     
  17. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Thanks Rodger. You mean DynaMat 11905 3/4" thick? Do you recall how much/what size you needed to cover it all?
     
  18. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Yes, that is it. One piece is plenty. It comes 32” x 54”.
     
    lookforjoe likes this.
  19. DSobota

    DSobota Daily Driver

    Location:
    Cleveland
    Gentlemen, New to the sight and following along with great interest. Started my own 76' Rest-Mod this Christmas. Currently working on the engine bay. Roger, Is Darin's idea with the rear cross member that big of an issue? I am at that point and was thinking along his same lines. BTW Love the detail of your work. x19001.jpg Thanks, D
     

    Attached Files:

  20. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Welcome to the X group, D! Always nice to have more company in the resto-mod gang. As you may have gathered, this forum loves photos, so be sure to post some from time to time. You should create your own thread and give us some more info on your build and how you decided to get an X1/9.

    As far as Darin's reinforcement ideas, I think they are all good and probably do contribute to body stiffness. As to whether they are a big issue, I don't think so, but who knows. The original X design was engineered to meet '70s era crash standards that were never implemented, so consequently it is already a pretty rigid structure, especially for a topless unibody. I'm not an engineer, but we have many in this group who could comment more on this topic. In this modern era of CAD programs used to design current vehicles, it is easy to see the effects of proposed structural changes on body stiffness, but with the seat-of-the-pants approach, it would be very hard to test the results. Since I did my swap using the MWB kit, I went with the recommendations from Matt Brannon, as he has done more of these swaps than anyone, and has extensive experience racing the X1/9. If anyone would be able to detect changes from the body modifications needed for the K20 swap, it should be him. My advice is to make your build what you want it to be and do the mods that make you feel good. Good luck with your build and make sure to share your progress! :)
     
    kmead and lookforjoe like this.

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