New toy

Discussion in 'Discussion Forum' started by Rodger, Sep 27, 2018.

  1. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Let the fun begin. Never welded before but considering how much I have spent (and will spend in the future), I figured I can get a decent set-up and learn to do it myself. Can’t let Hussein have all the fun. :)
    image.jpg
     
    myronx19, Anandastar, Dr.Jeff and 5 others like this.
  2. dllubin

    dllubin True Classic

    I've been checking out several of those Vulcan welders. Let us know how you like it.
     
    autox19 and kmead like this.
  3. Mechanogeek

    Mechanogeek True Classic

    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    Sweeeeet!
     
  4. autox19

    autox19 True Classic

    Location:
    East Lansing, Mi
    Ditto! been thinking the same.

    Odie
     
  5. Pete Whitstone

    Pete Whitstone True Classic

    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Better get that wallet back out if you are "keeping up with the Hollands", he's got an AC/DC tig welder too. :D

    Let us know how the Vulcan works out!

    Pete
     
    myronx19 and AKimball92 like this.
  6. Naah Pete...I think that welder does both MIG and TIG

    Nice machine Rodger. Way to go. You will have fun with it. And it is always great to learn a new skill. It will be really handy for building your new custom exhaust !!!!

    While on the subject...I too just got a new welder and am trying to improve my skills. My main problem is actually seeing the weld joint. I often lay down a really nice bead half an inch away from the joint......

    Thinking of splurging on a better helmet. This one:
    https://www.harborfreight.com/arcsafe-auto-darkening-welding-helmet-63749.html

    promises a better view of the weld puddle and surroundings. Kinda pricey, but gets good reviews. Anyone out there used it ? Worth the money or just hype ?
     
  7. Pete Whitstone

    Pete Whitstone True Classic

    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    I picked up a Miller "Classic" autodarkener for about $115 USD a few months back, love it. The main difference between the "classic" and their more expensive ones seem to be the size of the view port and the use of rotary click switches rather than membrane buttons.

    I had a lot of trouble seeing what was being laid down too. Most helmets were simply too dark, the MIG ones usually start at a shade 9. I need an 8 to be able to see what's going on. It about blinded my welding instructor when he used my helmet, but it works for me and does not hurt my eyes. Me being 55 and him being 20 years younger has a lot to do with it I would imagine. Flooding the area with halogen bay lights helps a lot too, but that is most practical at the bench and less practical elsewhere.

    What about it, Rodger, is that Vulcan a TIG machine also? If so, AC included (ability to weld aluminum)?

    Pete
     
  8. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    Nice!

    Mine was an 'inexpensive' model from Eastwood. I have found that the regulators they provide with the lower end equipment are sub-par. With mine, I would get flow creep, which wasted much Argon. Worth buying a better quality regulator/gauge head that will keep the regulated value you set. On the other hand, yours looks like sight glasses, so maybe the design is better, I dunno.
     
  9. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Will do. The Vulcan that I bought just does DC TIG, so I won’t be jumping into TIG welding aluminum intakes for now. My attempted projects will be TIG welding the exhaust for my K20 project and then doing the rust repairs on my ‘79 using the MIG function.
     
  10. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    The regulator that came with the Vulcan is a simple double gauge one. I want to be able to do an argon purge when I weld the SS exhaust so I bought a dual flow meter so I can run both the torch and the purge line from one tank.
     
  11. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    As far as a helmet goes, I did not want to scrimp on that as my eyes are most important to me. I splurged on a Lincoln Electric 3350. It got really great reviews and has a very large view port. I wanted to use an older set of flip down 2.5x loupes that I used to use when I treat patients. Allows for nice close up work and they fit under the helmet. It is auto darkening and goes up to 13, so perfect for TIG.
     
  12. AKimball92

    AKimball92 True Classic

    Even if you can't get the AC welding for aluminum with the skills you will gain from this your wallet will be happier even on aluminum. You will come to understand what a welder needs and be able to fab the individual parts to be welded. Typically they charge by time so if you can do all the prep work, and outsource the welding and only the welding, that intake will be much cheaper!
     
  13. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    There is a spool welder attachment that you can get for this Vulcan that will let you do MIG aluminum welding so if I find I have a need to do aluminum I could pick that up.
     
  14. lookforjoe

    lookforjoe True Classic

    I prefer welding stainless, it's like butter. Just get the settings right for the gauge steel, and make sure the tungsten is kept clean. It's pretty much inevitable that you will contaminate it, so take the time to stop & remove it. I bought a small bench grinder that is a dedicated tungsten sharpener. I use it often :D
     
    Rodger likes this.
  15. darwoodious

    darwoodious Darin Nelson

    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    To see the puddle in TIG, I need to use reading glasses, so I picked up a "cheater lens" that slips in behind the auto-darkening helmet. you can also just use reading glasses tho. For TIG you find yourself getting very close to the work to keep the tip close (supposed to be the width of your tungsten so like 3/32"!).

    For MIG, sparks are flying so I definitely back off and don't need the cheaters.

    Practice to get your brain and body used to welding is what you need (and watch lots of youtube "welding porn"). I keep a fire extinguisher close by too :)
     
    lookforjoe and Rodger like this.
  16. AKimball92

    AKimball92 True Classic

    When doing TIG SS welding be sure to practice. It is rather difficult to get the temp just right as indicated by the bead color. The optimal color is a slight bronzy color, the coolest (least hot) you will probably ever get it. Above that and the bead will turn all different shades of blue. As you get even hotter the edge of the blue will begin to move farther and farther from the weld bead and the bead itself turns back to a burnt silver color. When welding mine at Roush, after years of practice and classes followed by 3 years of no welding, even my beads were more on the burnt gray side with a touch of blue here or there. The professional welder there does this on the daily and said his are now typically a light bronze color and mine were basically carbon steel. I hope mine don't rust too quickly :oops:.

    Note: study up on the best rod for your SS tubing type. Certain rods have the right amount of added chromium to counteract the chromium leaving the HAZ. This process has a specific name...
     
  17. Mezzanine

    Mezzanine Daily Driver

    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    Hi Rodger-
    I should have you out to my house for some TIG lessons - it's a great skill to have. I'm no pro myself, but I've taught the basics many times.
     
  18. Rodger

    Rodger True Classic

    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    Sounds great. I just have to find some time.
     
  19. gwbfiat

    gwbfiat True Classic

    Location:
    Maple Valley, WA
    Can I join the lesson? I always wanted to learn how to weld and I also always wanted to be able to TIG weld too.

    George
     
  20. AKimball92

    AKimball92 True Classic

    One trick I learned to teach TIG, steps 2 and 3.
    1. start by showing the student (for lack of better word) laying a bead. Let them view the process up close and in person.
    2. control the torch and pedal, the student control the filler rod. Dip into center. Teacher moves the puddle to next drop location.
    3. control the filler rod and let the student control the torch and pedal, and you control the filler rod. "more pedal", "less pedal", dip "move 1/8th inch" dip.
     

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