Provider for auto plating after dipping, blasting?

Discussion in 'Discussion Forum' started by Chaostoy, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Hello all, I've been wondering about dipping a vehicle, blasting and then plating the bare metal. I remember many years ago finding a site that did plating in something like nickle or zink or the likes, but cannot find anything about it now.
    Does anyone have any knowledge of such a thing or any experiences with any of the processes of dipping and blasting, ect?
    I've located a place sorta close to me by a couple hours drive that does all but the plating. http://www.redistripindy.com/
    Any info at all or experiences of having these things done is welcome!
     
  2. kmead

    kmead True Classic

    Location:
    Michigan
    It is entirely dependent on where you are.

    Bob Brown had a horrible experience where after dipping it may not have had a neutralizing bath and certainly didn’t get a catephoretic primer so the car rusted horribly afterwards.

    It would be rare to find anyplace that actually zinc plated the car, usually the high level primers are enough. Most cars today are built with zinc plated steel and the car is then dipped in a primer system with a negative charge to get it into every part of the car, seams and all.

    The one you show doesn’t talk at all about coating the car after the paint and derusting process.
     
    Chaostoy likes this.
  3. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Not the same as what you seek, but there are powder coating places with ovens large enough to powder coat the whole body at once. However it is no better than paints for rust protection, just more durable from scratches, etc (but looks worse than a good paint finish). Chrome platers can do some other plating (e.g. nickel) but I doubt zinc, and I doubt there are any that can accomodate the whole body in one piece. Perhaps a large boat yard has some capability for zinc coating boat trailers, etc and could do it. But I'm with Karl (as always), thus may not be the best approach overall. Any process that is water based (including "dustless blasting") has a very high risk of rusting immediately after. They claim to rinse it after with a treated agent (phosphoric acid mix) to prevent rust formation. However there are two problems with that logic; 1) the solution is again water based (same risk), and 2) the concentration of phosphoric acid would need to be so high that it would cost ten times as much and it would eat the metal away. Phosphoric acid is a great way to remove rust, but it needs to be properly neutralized and further rust protection applied immediately after. Similarly, one problem with "acid dipping" a vehicle to strip it is the acid gets into places that cannot be completely neutralized (e,g, rocker panels, etc), and it continues to eat away after the fact. That's why the approach taken by top level restorers is the traditional methods of stripping, body working, and paint refinishing.
     
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  4. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    "Wraps" are continuing to develop with new products and increasing popularity. Three things to keep in mind regarding a wrap. They cover the surface with a vinyl film, so any existing corrosion or rust will continue to develop under it. They are intended to be "temporary", leaving it on for too long makes it extremely difficult to remove and typically damages the underlying surface finish. They don't last forever and begin to look awful in time (depending on conditions). If it is used on a 'new' surface (i.e. a newer car) then the rust issue isn't likely, but the 'temporary' nature of it is because you don't want to leave it on long enough to damage the underlying finish. On a older surface rust becomes a major concern. However they are relatively inexpensive (at least compared to a full repaint) and offer a wide variety of special finishes that can't be done with paint. So in some circumstances they might be an option. It seems lately they are being used more as accents than complete covers. For example custom stripes, two-tone color accents on limited surfaces (like accessories), etc.. I'm beginning to see some very creative uses this way. Another great application for wraps is the ability to print anything on it, for advertising and commercial uses. Like any such product the outcome is only as good as the prep and application technique, and it takes quite a lot of practice to apply well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
    Chaostoy likes this.
  5. 128kid

    128kid Courtney Waters

    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    If you search for companies that provide "e-coating" services, that's probably what you're looking for. E-coat (electrostatic coating) is a process similar to powder coating, where the part is negatively charged during coating but the coating is a primer paint (not powder). They can dip the car which provides coverage in all the hidden spots that powder wouldn't get to. And there are various steps involved to de-rust, neutralize, etc. The coating is not UV stable so it needs to be top-coated for exterior applications. No big deal on a car you intend to paint, just don't leave it exposed for a long time before paint.

    I don't have any direct experience with it in auto restoration but have used it in production of new parts (automotive sheet metal fabrications - steel and aluminum). Cheaper than powder and much better coverage than conventionally sprayed paint.
     
  6. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    E coat would be a great way to go. Do they have the capability to do an entire car?

    One possible draw back for any plating process would be that all body work will need to be done after the plating. And that will ruin the plating in that area. So if a lot of body work is needed it might not be worth doing the plating.
     
  7. 128kid

    128kid Courtney Waters

    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    A quick google or youtube search comes up with a number of examples of whole cars being coated. Finding a good company local to you could be another story!

    With the e-coat you can sand it off to do body work. If welding is required, you would have to spot recoat the back side or possibly redo the whole thing (if no access to the back). I've seen posts where some guys said they acid dip and neutralize, then do metal work, then send it back for a re-dip and e-coat.
     
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  8. The e coat sounds like a nice way to go. I just basically was interested in the 850 spider never rusting away. Thanks for the ideas!
     
  9. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    I'm not sure I'd go to the extent of coating, bodyworking, re-coating, etc, etc.. But the idea of being able to dip the entire unibody for E-coating (much like most factories dip for painting) is very appealing....you know, getting into every nook and cranny. Rust is a very challenging enemy.

    I guess it would come down to availability of the service near you and the cost. I view all of my project cars from a bit of a "business" approach; I always try to keep the expenses within the vehicle's realistic value. I don't "flip" cars, but it is foolish to invest a ton of money into something that simply isn't worth it. Just good sense and smart financial logic. Having built and enjoyed countless cars in my very long history of this hobby, I've come to the realization that they are simply toys that come and go. Unless you are in the "more money than brains" category, you have to keep things on a realistic level if you wish to continue enjoying this hobby.
     

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