Sticky gas pedal?

Fiat4Fun

Daily Driver
Greetings all,
Well, getting my '71 850 ready for the summer season, and when I press on the gas pedal, it sticks and does not return. The car has been sitting all winter. I thought maybe the pedal was sticking on the carpet, but that does not seem to be the case.
I am wondering if I should pull the pedal, or if it might be time to replace the cable.
The linkage on the valve cover is very reactive, and the spring is good there.
Any thoughts before I dive in?
 

JimD

Waiting for Godot...
Moderator
On an X, I would recommend checking for a frayed cable sticking in the ends of the sheath, but I have never owned an 850. Looking at the pictures on the MWB site, the cables they are very similar in set up to the early carb'd Xs. So this could still be something to check out. You don't want to end up stuck at full throttle. :)

Another thought, start by disconnecting the cable from the pedal and see if the pedal is sticky without the cable? If the pedal is free and the valve cover linkage is free, the cable becomes the #1 suspect.
 

Fiat4Fun

Daily Driver
So, I finally got to play with the 850 sticky pedal.

I took the cable off the pedal, and the pedal moved with no issues. I got another cable and sleeve and replaced it.
The cable was stiff inside the sleeve. When I pulled it, I attached a cable and pulled it back through the tunnel, and it made it easy to replace.
Took about 1-2 hours total. Pulled the rear wheel and the tunnel cover, and it was very easy fix. I do have a extra pedal assembly just in case....
 

850EV

850 Project
I replaced my cable recently as well. Worst case, they make a tacky lube for the cable to slide on in the sleeve. Hopefully you do not need to mess with that.
 

Dr.Jeff

True Classic
A easy way to lube cables (which I highly recommend) is with a motorcycle control cable lube tool. Looks like this:
41Gq54rgkYL._AC_SX466_.jpg


Works with any spray lube, like this:
sddefault.jpg
 

Frank L. Di Gioia

True Classic
A easy way to lube cables (which I highly recommend) is with a motorcycle control cable lube tool. Looks like this:
View attachment 47517

Works with any spray lube, like this:
View attachment 47518
Wow Jeff! There are trick products for just about everything now. In my motorcycle days you pulled everything and taped a plastic bag around one end. You then hung it from the garage ceiling or door frame. You then poured oil in the bag and waited for the puddle to form on the floor.
If it was a British bike it was needed less often as they came with self destruct oiling. If anyone doubts this about British bikes note that 1972 BSA's came with a FACTORY installed sponge on the left side between the primary case and the frame. I saw them! I think there was actually a part number for the sponge.
 

Dr.Jeff

True Classic
Wow Jeff! There are trick products for just about everything now. In my motorcycle days you pulled everything and taped a plastic bag around one end. You then hung it from the garage ceiling or door frame. You then poured oil in the bag and waited for the puddle to form on the floor.
If it was a British bike it was needed less often as they came with self destruct oiling. If anyone doubts this about British bikes note that 1972 BSA's came with a FACTORY installed sponge on the left side between the primary case and the frame. I saw them! I think there was actually a part number for the sponge.
I tried doing it that way once, and only once.

These little lube tools have been around for a long time. There's even a couple newer versions of them. But they all work great for just about any cable. And the tool is not expensive. You can also use it with lubes that come in plastic bottles with a little hose on the top (like those teflon types).
 
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