Supercharger AMR500

Hybridfiat

Power costs money, more p
Has anyone here fitted or researched the fitting of one of these/similar superchargers to the stock engine?
I'm just planning ahead here as the respray on my stock car is first. But I'd like to tickle the power just a tad.
Ive seen throttle bodies for fuel injection on FleaBay but that would mean an engine management system albeit simple. Also there are Carbs for forced induction around.

Any thoughts?
 
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kmead

Old enough to know better
Not an option I have seen but it is a one I like. If it was set up to come on early and then tapered off it would be a nice match to the engine by adding some torque low and preserving the high end with a little kick.
 

Bobkat

1979 x1/9
The fit these to bugs and old Goldwings. They are very loud and not in a good way. There is one size larger that is common in Japan that may be better.
 

Hybridfiat

Power costs money, more p
Interesting. That is sucking the fuel/air mix and then compressing it. I didn't know that could be done. Solves a problem for me in a sense. No need to worry about leaks in the carbie when pressurised. The carbie is doing what it is designed to do, mix fuel and air in a low pressure environment.
 

carl

True Classic
There were a few Fiat 124 twin cams that came with a supercharger with a carb, I believe there was a 131/Brava that had a Weber 34ADF bolted to the supercharger and thus the air/fuel mixture was being sucked into the motor.
 

Dr.Jeff

True Classic
If you use a carb with boost, then it usually works better to "suck" through the carb rather than "blow" through it. In other words, sucking is better than blowing...sorry, I couldn't resist a cheap joke. As you said, carbs are designed to work best with negative pressure. Plus there tends to be issues with float bowl pressure and fuel levels, boost leaks at carb body mating surfaces and throttle shafts, etc., when blowing through them.

However with any boosted setup (supercharger or turbo) the air-fuel ratio is critical under all conditions. The added charge makes the engine very susceptible to detonation (the explanation gets into a lot of detailed tech talk). And carbs are limited in their AFR precision/efficiency compared to EFI, so they tend to lead to failures. Many variables at play here, therefore a blanket statement like that cannot be true in every case. Drag cars have used carbs on blowers for decades. But that is a completely different scenario than a street driven passenger car.

Between this blower being undersized and using a carb to feed it, I think you may very well be in for a disappointment unfortunately. Major performance enhancements rarely come cheap.
 

Bobkat

1979 x1/9
This small Eaton may be a better solution. Eaton ETN TVS R410. Still small in size but good for up to 1600 cc
 
Back in the 60s, I had a friend who bought a Studebaker Lark (66?) with an Eaton supercharger. It was actually a factory option. It was a real sleeper!
 

Hybridfiat

Power costs money, more p
Of course if I blow the motor I'd have to fit another Starlet GT motor and gearbox. I just happen to have a spare.:rolleyes:
Had a look online for an Eaton ETN. Looks more practical than a AMR500. I'll get the car painted and see if it is sellable as is. If not, a bolt-on may have to do.
Thanks for the advice.
 

gene cooley

Autocrosser
Of course if I blow the motor I'd have to fit another Starlet GT motor and gearbox. I just happen to have a spare.:rolleyes:
Had a look online for an Eaton ETN. Looks more practical than a AMR500. I'll get the car painted and see if it is sellable as is. If not, a bolt-on may have to do.
Thanks for the advice.
Probably best to change the "if I blow the motor" to "when".
Not sure if they are related to Eaton, but Studebaker and Avanti also used Paxton superchargers.
 
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