what to do with extra fiat parts

Discussion in 'Discussion Forum' started by dragonsgate, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. dragonsgate

    dragonsgate True Classic

    Location:
    arkansas
    I have been cleaning out X19 parts and decided to see what I could make with some of them. A few years ago I started a buggy from a rusted out 75 X and was calling it the post apocalyptic electric buggy but it was getting heavier than I wanted so abandoned it.
    I am now on a revised edition.
    The goal as before is to as much stuff on hand as I can.
    A lot of the stuff is from other projects and has been laying around for 6-10 years.
    I had to buy most of the stuff years ago but the statute of limitations has expired so I consider it as free now.
    So far I had to get two brake hoses and paid shipping for a speedo and cable.
    The buggy is tacked together using some old flux-core wire that came with the welder when I bought the welder years ago.
    I am low on CO2 so tried to save some money by using the flux-core.
    As far as I am concerned that stuff sux so will spring for a new bottle for the finish welding. 1.JPG 2.JPG 3.JPG 4.JPG 5.JPG A couple other things extra fiat parts are used for. Gear shift and transfer case boots. 6.JPG Some red lens paint on X turn lights make great brake lights for my trailer. Not shown is the Fiat 128 Weber carb on my son's slant six dodge. 7.JPG
     
    Rodger likes this.
  2. Dan Sarandrea (Phila)

    Dan Sarandrea (Phila) Waitin' On Parts...

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
  3. dragonsgate

    dragonsgate True Classic

    Location:
    arkansas
  4. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Back in the 70's I built a couple of the Manx style buggies. They were very popular in So Cal. Even with a pathetic VW engine they were light enough to be fun.

    Your project reminds me of one of my earliest ventures into "customizing" and car building. When I was about 8 or 9 years old a neighbor saw that I liked to work on bicycles, minibikes, etc.. So when their old dodge wore out, and the local dealer would not give any trade-in value on it, they gave it to me to play with. I proceeded to strip it down, cut off everything not needed, get the engine running and made a buggy to drive around the open land behind our house (we lived in a very rural part of So Cal, although now it is a big over-crowded city). My dad killed me after seeing what I did, but that was instrumental to developing my car building disease (maybe he was right).

    Fun project, keep us informed.
     
    bpimm and mkmini like this.
  5. dragonsgate

    dragonsgate True Classic

    Location:
    arkansas
    Getting a car and fixing it at age 9..Wow!...I was just starting to make model cars at 9. I did make some extra soda money painting flames on the fenders of my friends bikes after they saw mine.
     
  6. Daniel Forest

    Daniel Forest True Classic

    Location:
    Montreal,Canada
    I got news for you @dragonsgate, this is still what you are doing. (Like all of us in this forum).
     
    Dr.Jeff likes this.
  7. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Aside from that first one that was given to me, I bought, repaired/restored, and sold 3 cars before I was old enough to drive. That was how I made my extra soda money.
     
  8. dragonsgate

    dragonsgate True Classic

    Location:
    arkansas
    Sounds like you are talking big money, while I am talking "soda money."
     
  9. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Well, we didn't drink sodas (mom said it wasn't good for us), so I can't say just how big of a soda it would by. But back then you could find a running/driving car for a couple hundred dollars, I'd spend a few bucks on parts, and sell it for a small profit. So not really big money, and it would go straight back into the next one (which was the reason for selling the last one, to buy something else rather than to make money).
    I took care of the various neighbor's yards for spending money (also not a lot). I'll never forget one of the biggest business lessons I learned as a child. After saving all the money I got from doing lawns, I went to the county fair. It was the first year I was old enough to go by myself. Wondered into the "arcade" area, which was something new to me. Started playing a couple games and before I knew it I'd spent all the money it took two years to earn. I've never been a gambler or player since.
    Sorry to get so far off topic.
     
  10. Paul Valente

    Paul Valente Automotive Engineer

    Location:
    Motor City USA
    Nice work! You might want to consider a center takeoff steering rack. Should be able to find something in a junkyard. GM J-cars, maybe.
    With the suspension travel that you want in a dune buggy, there will be a lot of bump-steer with the short tie-rods. Also, being rear-steer with the rack mounted high like that, when the wheel goes up, it will toe-in which means the car will steer more than you want in a corner....which is fine but it is "less comfortable" than if it were to toe-out. It feels better to turn the wheel a little more than to have to unwind it in order to maintain the trajectory you want.
    Can't wait to see how it comes out!

    EDIT: I guess if the tie rod is matched to the control arm, the length isn't an issue as long as you get it closer to a neutral position at ride height.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2018
    Dr.Jeff and mkmini like this.
  11. dragonsgate

    dragonsgate True Classic

    Location:
    arkansas
    This is a experiment as much as anything else.
    I considered using the struts but didn't want them sicking up high so decided to fab my own design with what was on hand.
    The first try the wheels would splay out when I bounced down on it.
    Moved the rack up and matched the arc of the rod ends with that of the control arms and tires stay straight with about 400 pounds (My son and me) mashing down on the front.
    I have built a couple of dune buggies but used prefabbed front ends so it was plug and play.
     

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