Working on the House....

kmead

Old enough to know better
He does have some sharp edges, that man.

He also has a point.

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lookforjoe

True Classic
You might consider leaving them wild until you resolve the vertical trim and the side trim intersection approach.

I would look at other houses in your area that are of a similar vintage for clues to the way it once was.

I would make it a vertical cut with a back miter that then matched the trim running down the side of the house under the soffit (the frieze). This would join and lead your eye around rather than stopping it. Alternatively it could be a vertical cut that meets the corner trim (or pilaster as it can also be known as), again leading your eye to the next element in the building.

My four square had cedar shakes above the porch roof that ran around the entire upper story with trim above and below it but no corner trim. The shakes were countered/woven at the corner. Clapboard either met a vertical trim or often used a steel joiner that was lapped over and nailed onto the clapboard on each side of the corner (this was an innovation in the 20’s with the advent of kit houses and lower skilled laborers)

The vertical trim you are showing is based on the sad dimensions of vinyl parts or modern dimensional lumber choices at the big box stores.

I will find some pics of some of the kit houses of the era, Sears, Montgomery Wards and Aladdin all offered them and the images are good reference to how trim was dealt with during that era. There are also plan books from the time which would be appropriate reference (I own some of the catalogs from the era). I need to go to work early today so I can’t do so until this afternoon.

If you are interested in spending some time have a look at the teens to twenties versions of the Aladdin catalogues (a Michigan company): https://www.cmich.edu/library/clark...y_City_Aladdin_Co/Catalogs/Pages/default.aspx

Great progress.
Many thanks, Karl. I figured I should leave the base of the rakeboard until I sorted out what to do with the vertical trim. Creating an unified line from the base of the rakeboard down into the vertical trim make sense. I have a lumber yard about 1/4 mile from my house, so that is where I got the wood & PVC for the rakeboard - they deliver for free, which is good since I had no way to transport 24' lengths of board :D

The house is from the 1890's - under the absestos siding is the original wood outer walls. I just need to make the trim make sense with the overall flow of the house as it is with the asbestos siding. I will likely paint it house color - I'm not planning on removing the lower cedar panels at this point, so having it not stand out as a separate element makes the most sense to me at the moment.
 

lookforjoe

True Classic
Got a first coat of green done on the upper portion of the siding after work today





It will look better after another coat or two, I like it so far


Morning shot:

Looks a little glossy - should be satin finish - not sure what's up with that.

 
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kmead

Old enough to know better
The paint will flatten a bit over time and get some environmental deglossing (dirt) over time.

Semi gloss is better at shedding dirt so it is a good choice from a variety of perspectives.
 

DanielForest

True Classic
I was kind of expecting the walls to be painted red with a yellow roof! Otherwise, I could live without the hot wheels sticker...
 

lookforjoe

True Classic
Got the rest of the upper section coated, from the windows down will need a second coat. Got one coat of trim paint on the windows. The crappy vinyl siding is visible on the side in this pic - that will be removed.





Karl - this is what you meant about making the vertical trim mate with the rakeboard? I won't be using a piece this wide, as it will be too close to the bathroom window (left side, facing the house)

 

kmead

Old enough to know better
Yes, if you do it that way there could also be a piece of trim along the side currently covered by the vinyl.
 

lookforjoe

True Classic
Yes, if you do it that way there could also be a piece of trim along the side currently covered by the vinyl.
Yes - I was assuming I would join two pieces to make a right-angle trim for front & sides. I'm going to do the back of the house next, so that trim won't happen for some time. Can't wait for it to be gone - the front looks so much better than the sides now.

 

lookforjoe

True Classic
Last two weekends the wife & I worked on removing the vinyl from the back of the house, and replacing the nasty replacement windows with wood construction units. Many more broken tiles back here to deal with.

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Vinyl crap coming out - these must have been done around the same time as the vinyl siding, poorly installed, loose in casement, not leveled, caulked or insulated. Nothing wrong with the actual window design, I just don't like the loss of window opening/glass area compared to 'new install' windows of the same overall dimension.

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bbrown

Bob Brown
Moderator
Looks like you've got your hands full ...
I don't envy you on that project. Keep up the good work! ;)
 

tigeravg

True Classic
You guys in the east aquire skills by neccessity. We get "dry-rot" here, but most of the wood structures seem to stay in good shape for decades, despite shitty construction. Analogous to rust repair. I walk away from lots of projects with any rust. I just don't like to deal with it. You guys have no problems fixing it right up. A skill I have no desire to practice. And frankly, kinda scares me.
The house looks great, and good job on the repairs. My wife thinks finding a home like yours would be "fun". I believe she believes what she sees on the DYI network. All I see is work I'm bad at...
Again, good job brave soul.
 

lookforjoe

True Classic
Still plugging away, after being off my feet for the past three weeks following the right heel surgery.

This weekend, we removed the downstairs front windows, repaired the rough openings, installed the new windows & then made the exterior case moldings. Also stripped & started restaining the cedar panels



Rot that was covered with the aluminum siding. Instead of fixing it, the PO installed replacement windows, & siliconed aluminum flashing over it :( The house did not originally have a covered porch, so presumably this came about from water leaks with the original sash windows. It's all dry in there, no termites etc.,



Stud & plate repaired


Gabriel helping out



It's so hot, I'm working in my beachwear :) Rough opening wrapped with butyl. I'm getting ready to install the new window



Gabriel monitoring the work progress



Two of the other three taking it easy away from the noise











Gable runnng trim FINALLY came - so Ann started painting that - it will be the same color as the front door

 
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lookforjoe

True Classic
Finally got the running trim painted - had to go over it as the paint mix was off on the first batch I had made. Got it installed today





Need to do the vertical trim to tie into the gable trim.



Still some minor work on the door trim & porch, then the front is done. Moving the scaffolding to the back tomorrow. Once the back is done, I'll move to the side street side of the house. I'm happy with the progress so far.

 
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