wires everyhere and knowledge no where

Discussion in 'Workshop Forum' started by toddr124, Oct 20, 2019.

  1. toddr124

    toddr124 Hagerstown, MD

    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD
    This week Carl helped (okay really did most of the work) me change from AC heater box to nonAC heater box. Thanks so much.

    To do this work I needed to remove the dash in the car. Now I have a lot of loose connectors and wires visible. Here are some pictures. Anyone have any idea? 2  wire with something fusebox.jpg 2 wire connector passenger side.jpg 4 wire white connector passenger side.jpg 5 loose wires driver side.jpg 6 wire orange connector.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Ernie

    Ernie Daily Driver

    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    What's the reason for changing heater boxes? I recall Carl mentioning it from time to time.

    I have a friend who would like some help making his '77 road worthy again. I remember working this car maybe 10 years ago and it had an a/c radiator (condenser?) but no a/c components in the engine compartment.

    Just wondering if we'll need to add a different heater box to the to-do list.
     
  3. carl

    carl True Classic

    Location:
    Virginia
    Didn't use blue tape and markers to ID all wires, did you....lesson learned! Ganged connectors should be easy to match to items on the dash or console. Make a list of all the switches that are unwired and look up the wire colors in a wiring diagram.

    Hopefully others can give a more specific answer.
     
  4. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    Carl beat me to it. Seriously Todd, you did not label them or take pictures? Don't mean to bust your balls. O.K., I do. :D
    But as simple as it may sound, most of them should be obvious by where they are sitting, what the connectors match to (configuration wise), and process of elimination. While I agree with the suggestion of using the wire colors to ID them on the wire diagrams/charts, I also caution that those diagrams/charts are often wrong (colors), so it may add to the confusion.
     
  5. aarpcard

    aarpcard True Classic

    Location:
    NJ
    The 4-pin connector in your third picture with pink, black, orange, and red wires is for the clock.

    The ignition switch uses the same connector, but the wire colors are different I think.

    The red 6 pin connector in your 5th picture is I believe for the O2 sensor timer, but I'm not 100% sure on that, although the dash cluster uses 6 pin connectors so if the wires are long enough it might be for that....
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
    Dan Sarandrea (Phila) likes this.
  6. toddr124

    toddr124 Hagerstown, MD

    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD

    Thanks. I do not have a clock in my other X1/9 so I didn't recognize the connector. All these connectors are not used to my knowledge. That's why I am asking.

    My biggest question is the 5 loose wires. Do the 2 of the same color connect to each other?

    Carl, you think I am going to label stuff under the dash?:rolleyes:
     
  7. Dan Sarandrea (Phila)

    Dan Sarandrea (Phila) Waitin' On Parts...

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Pic #4 with red and blue/black with male spade connectors and with red, blue/black, and orange with housed female connectors.....

    The red and blue/black wires with the male spade connectors mate up with same color female spade connector wires coming from the non-A/C heater blower motor. The connectors are protected by those off-white 2-inch long plastic clamshell covers that are used elsewhere on the car. The motor will also have a black ground that is fastened to one of the cowl studs that holds the upper part of the heater plenum to the underside of the cowl.

    The other red and blue/black wires with the housed connectors plug into the non-A/C fan control switch (off-1-2). Red is low speed and blue/black is high speed. The orange wire grouped with these other two provides key on power. This circuit powers other stuff like the hazard switch, brake light switch, dash panel lights and the rear defogger.

    The non-A/C fan switch has three male prongs, marked H, B, and L. Can't guarantee it, but I'd think that L=low=red, H=high=blue/black, and B=battery/power=orange. Best to use a multimeter to confirm.
     
  8. Dan Sarandrea (Phila)

    Dan Sarandrea (Phila) Waitin' On Parts...

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Yep, just looked at the wiring diagram, the red housing should connect to the FI's 30,000mi counter-upper box. Those wire colors should be pink/red, orange, black, gray/yellow, and yellow.
     
  9. Dan Sarandrea (Phila)

    Dan Sarandrea (Phila) Waitin' On Parts...

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Pic #2, with a blue and a white, can't find that. But the one next to it, lt blue/white and green/white, could have been for two A/C items, the safety thermoswitch or the frost prevention switch.
     
  10. toddr124

    toddr124 Hagerstown, MD

    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD
    thanks. I will try connect them tomorrow.
     
  11. carl

    carl True Classic

    Location:
    Virginia
    You can't bust Todd's balls, his wife has already dealt with that aspect of his life. However, let's use this as a life lesson...when you remove something with wires, you need some tape and marker to label everything. Contrary to what you think, you won't remember where the wire go and your photo session will probably miss something.

    Don't the AC cars have that funky box in a cage device next to the wiper motor which obviously has wires going to the AC unit that is no longer used.
     
  12. kmead

    kmead Old enough to know better

    Location:
    Michigan
    Yes the AC cars use a resistor for the fan to give it the multiple speeds. Yes it is no longer needed if using the non AC fan and switch.
     
  13. Dr.Jeff

    Dr.Jeff True Classic

    Location:
    Sin City
    I admit that I've always relied on tape/marker labels when doing this type work. As we know I'm not one to take photos so that method usually does not happen. And even if it did, like Carl said it seems no matter how many pics you take there will still be something missing. However I've recently found there can be a drawback to the tape label method...at least where I'm currently living. I have a few ongoing vehicle projects in various states, some with the dash removed and all wires labeled this way. But the climate here is so brutal that the Sharpie ink on my labels has faded to the point of not being visible, and the adhesive on the masking tape has dried out to the point of the labels falling off (even the ones that were folded over around a wire and stuck to themselves). So after only a couple of months I find that almost all of my labels are no longer of any use and I'll have to figure out all of the wiring the hard way. And to think of all the time I spent carefully labeling everything. I'm not sure of a better way to do this, but it would not be the same most anywhere else.
     
  14. Daniel Forest

    Daniel Forest True Classic

    Location:
    Montreal,Canada
    I'm using less and less tape and more and more pics. After 20 years, the tape tried to dried-out. The pics? Don't know. Can't find them! :confused:
     
    mkmini likes this.
  15. carl

    carl True Classic

    Location:
    Virginia
    You guys are in a different car universe then me. When I take one apart it will be back together in less than six months, not six or more years. Maybe a notebook with copious notes and diagrams would work for you guys.
     
  16. Daniel Forest

    Daniel Forest True Classic

    Location:
    Montreal,Canada
    Good for you. In my case, I'm too busy wrapping telephone poles with protective matresses for the day when my kids will be old enough to drive. Some peope are just not planning ahead... ;)

    And in my case, I used binders... Much easier to add new stuff "in between" than using arrows to move things from one page to another...
     
  17. carl

    carl True Classic

    Location:
    Virginia
    Some things just attain legend status here. I accept my culpability in that matter.
    Yes, all my car notebooks are three ring binders but the little notebook my wife and I use to store all 847 passwords is a spiral.
     
    kmead likes this.

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